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[[File:AbdAlRahim.jpg|250px]]
al-Ginco in a 2001 confession video, made after the Taliban tortured him

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A Syrian-Kurd, Abd Al-Rahim Abdul Rassak al-Ginco (عبدالرحیم عبدالرسک الجنکو) (also al-Janko) was a student in the United Arab Emirates who traveled to Afghanistan in 2000, where he was captured by the Taliban, who suspected he was a US spy, and then captured by the American, and spent seven year in extrajudicial detention in the Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[1] A videotape of al-Rahim was discovered in the rubble of a senior al Qaeda member Mohammed Atef. He said it was a video taped in 2000, following Atef's torturing him into confessing to spying against the Taliban. The Bush administration called it a "martyrdom video", claiming that in it al-Rahim spoke of dying as a martyr following the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan.

He claims to have been captured by the Taliban and tortured by al-Qaeda into making the tape, while the United States believes he made it voluntarily and made him one of the first terrorist suspects listed on the FBI Seeking Information - War on Terrorism list.[1]

After begging a British journalist to alert the Americans that he had been held prisoner by the Taliban for two years, he was arrested and held in extrajudicial detention in the United States Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[2]

He is currently living in Antwerpen, Belgium [3]

Alleged martyrdom videoEdit

File:Abd al-Rahim-1.ogg

On January 14, 2002, a five video cassettes were recovered from the rubble of the destroyed home of Mohammad Atef outside of Kabul, Afghanistan. The tapes showed Abderraouf Jdey, Ramzi Binalshibh, Muhammad Sa'id Ali Hasan, and Khalid Ibn Muhammad Al-Juhani vowing to die as martyrs.[4] A video of Al-Rahim was also found in the rubble, and described as a martyrdom video. It was the first time authorities had reason to suspect him of any wrongdoing. NBC News said the videos had been recorded after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Al Rahim said that the video was not a martyrdom video, that it was a confession videotaped in 2000, after the Taliban had tortured him into confessing to being a spy for Israel and the USA.[1]

In response, on January 17, 2002 the FBI released to the public the first Most Wanted Terrorists Seeking Information list, in order to profile the five wanted terrorists about whom very little was known, but who were suspected of plotting additional terrorist attacks. The videos were shown by the FBI without sound, to guard against the possibility that the messages contained signals for other terrorists.[5][6]

File:FBI Abd-al-Rahim.jpg

U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft called upon people worldwide to help "identify, locate and incapacitate terrorists who are suspected of planning additional attacks against innocent civilians... These men could be anywhere in the world." Ashcroft added that an analysis of the audio suggested "the men may be trained and prepared to commit future suicide terrorist acts."

On that day, Ramzi Binalshibh was one of the only four known names among the five. Ashcroft said not much was known about any of them except Binalshibh. The other initial known three are still featured in compiled video clips on the FBI site, in order of appearance, Muhammad Sa'id Ali Hasan, Abd Al-Rahim, and Khalid Ibn Muhammad Al-Juhani.[7][8][9] The fifth subject was identified a week later as Abderraouf Jdey.

Adb Al-Rahim, along with three others, was later removed by the FBI from the official count on the main page of the Seeking Information list. By February 2, 2003, the FBI rearranged its entire wanted lists on its web site, into the current configuration. The outstanding five martyr video suspects (including Jdey's Montreal associate Boussora) were moved to a separate linked page, titled "Martyrdom Messages/video, Seeking Information Alert" (Although both Jdey and Boussora were later returned to the main FBI list page). Around this time the FBI also changed the name of the list, to the FBI "Seeking Information - War on Terrorism", to distinguish it from its other wanted list of "Seeking Information," which the FBI already uses for ordinary fugitives, those who are not terrorists.[10]

Transfer from Taliban to US custodyEdit

Abd Al Rahim was one of nine former Taliban prisoners the Associated Press pointed out had gone from Taliban custody to American custody.[11]

Tim Reid, writing in The Times recorded how he met al-Ginco in January 2002, when he was stranded in Kandahar, after his release from two years in brutal Taliban custody.[12] Reid described finding al-Ginco, and four other foreign prisoners, as the only remaining occupants of a Taliban prison, which had been abandoned and emptied after the Taliban's collapse.

In January 2002, shortly after the Taleban had fled Kandahar after the US-led invasion of Afghanistan, I arrived in the city. Amid the chaos and confusion there was a bizarre scene playing out in the jail. The entire prison had been emptied, except for five men who had chosen to stay there because they had nowhere else to go. There was a man from Manchester called Jamal Udeen, two Saudis, a student from Tartarstan - and Mr al-Ginco. They became known as the “Kandahar Five”.

Reid described agreeing to help contact American and British authorities for help on the men's behalf, not expecting that the Americans would send them to Guantanamo.[12]

According to Reid, al-Ginco told his lawyers he ended up in Afghanistan after running away from home.[12] He believed European countries would grant him refugee status if he applied from Afghanistan. Instead he found himself being used as forced labor by the Taliban—and when something he said triggered their suspicion they sent him to one of their own torture prisons. He told his lawyers he was tortured by Mohammed Atef himself. Eventually he was tortured into confessing he was an Israeli spy. Reid wrote that his coerced confessions was broadcast on Arabic TV in Abu Dhabi.

Reid wrote that Al Ginco's lawyers say that while a videotape found in the rubble of Mohammed Atef's ruined house included footage of Al Ginco, it was footage of the confession coerced from during his torture by the Taliban, and in no way indicated any kind of association with terrorism.[12]

Denounced Arkan Mohammad Ghafil Al KarimEdit

During his testimony at his own Combatant Status Review Tribunal, Arkan Mohammad Ghafil Al Karim said that both he and al-Ginco had been prisoners of the Taliban since early 2000.[13]

Al Karim, a refugee from Iraq, said he was imprisoned on February 15, 2000 because al-Ginco, who had recently been arrested himself, had denounced him to the Taliban, claiming he was an American spy. Al Karim said that when the Northern Alliance had captured the prison, both men were transferred to American custody, and ended up in Guantanamo.

Combatant Status ReviewEdit

Main article: Combatant Status Review Tribunal

Janko was among the 60% of prisoners who participated in the tribunal hearings.[14] A Summary of Evidence memo was prepared for the tribunal of each detainee.

Janko's memo accused him of the following:[15][16]

a. The Detainee is a member of al Qaida.
  1. The Detainee claims Syrian citizenship.
  2. The Detainee lived in the United Arab Emirates and traveled to Afghanistan.
  3. The Detainee traveled to Afghanistan in January 2000.
  4. The Detainee traveled to Afghanistan for the Jihad.
  5. The Detainee is a member of al Qaida.
  6. The Detainee trained with the al Qaida terrorist organization.
  7. The Detainee trained at al Farouq training camp in Afghanistan, January 2000.
  8. While at al Farouq, the Detainee received training on small arms, mountain tactics, topography, and jungle/guerilla type warfare.
  9. The Detainee volunteered to be a suicide martyr.
  10. The Detainee is associated with an al Qaida weapons specialist, who possessed his own poisons and explosives training camp.


On March 3, 2006, in response to a court order from Jed Rakoff the Department of Defense published a fourteen page summarized transcript from his Combatant Status Review Tribunal.[17]

  • Janko acknowledged Syrian citizenship, living in the UAE, traveling to Afghanistan in January 2000 and studying for 18 days in small arms training at al Farouq upon arriving. He denied all other allegations.

Habeas corpusEdit

A writ of habeas corpus, Abdul Rahim Abdul Razak Al Ginco v. Robert M. Gates, was submitted on Abdul Rahim Abdul Razak Al Ginco's behalf.[18][19] The United States Department of Defense published the unclassified dossiers from 179 captives' Combatant Status Review Tribunals.[20] But they did not publish Abdul Rahim Abdul Razak Al Ginco's dossier.

On June 16, 2008 the United States Supreme Court declined to consider his mandamus request.[21]

Administrative Review BoardEdit

Detainees whose Combatant Status Review Tribunal labeled them "enemy combatants" were scheduled for annual Administrative Review Board hearings. These hearings were designed to assess the threat a detainee may pose if released or transferred, and whether there are other factors that warrant his continued detention.[22]

First annual Administrative Review BoardEdit

Janko chose to participate in his Administrative Review Board hearing.[23] In the Spring of 2006, in response to a court order from Jed Rakoff the Department of Defense published a Summarized transcript from his Administrative Review Board.[17]

A Summary of Evidence memo was prepared for Abd Al Rahim Abdul Rassak Janko's first annual Administrative Review Board, on 24 October 2005.[24] The memo listed factors for and against his continued detention.

The following primary factors favor continued detention

a. Commitment
  1. The detainee claims that he stayed with an Imam for two to three days. During this time, the Imam gave the detainee money and suggested that the detainee should direct his life toward Jihad. The two discussed Jihad in Chechnya.
  2. In a video that was obtained from a senior member of al Qaida’s residence, the detainee claims that he was recruited to join the Jihad in Chechnya.
  3. The detainee claims that he stayed at an al Qaida guesthouse in Kabul.
b. Training
  1. The detainee stated that he attended the al Farouq training camp in Kabul, Afghanistan between January and February 2000.
  2. While at the camp, the detainee claims that he received training in small arms, assault weapons (ie., AK-47 G3 and M-16) and various other Russian and Saudi made weapons. The detainee also received training in mountain fighting tactics.
  3. As associate of the detainee stated the detainee admitted to receiving military training outside of Afghanistan.
c. Connections/Associations
An associate of the detainee claims that the detainee was possibly an agent for a foreign government.
d. Other Relevant Data
  1. The detainee claims that after a dispute with his father over a loan the detainee received from a friend, the detainee attempted to leave the United Arab Emirates.
  2. The detainee claims that he sought asylum with numerous countries.
  3. The detainee claims that he requested to leave the training camp after eighteen days. As a result, the detainee claims that he was suspected of spying.
  4. The detainee claims that while at the guesthouse, he worked on repairing and servicing heavy weapons. The detainee claims that he did not have any experience in this field and he learned on the job.


The following primary factors favor release or transfer

a. An associate of the detainee claims that the Taliban tortured the detainee to the extent that he had little use of his right arm. As a result, the detainee spoke poorly of the Taliban.
b. The detainee claims that al Qaida tortured him until he admitted he was a spy.


Second annual Administrative Review BoardEdit

A Summary of Evidence memo was prepared for Abd AL Rahim Abdul Raza Janko's second annual Administrative Review Board, on 26 June 2006.[25] The memo listed factors for and against his continued detention.

The following primary factors favor continued detention

a. Commitment
  1. The detainee claimed that he stayed with an Imam for two to three days. During this time, the Imam gave the detainee money and suggested that he should direct his life toward jihad. The two discussed the jihad in Chechnya.
  2. The detainee stated that he was deported from the United Arab Emirates to Afghanistan. The detainee flew from United Arab Emirates to Pakistan at the expense of the United Arab Emirates government.
  3. While en route to Afghanistan, the detainee was convinced to go to the Taliban and tell them that their embassy in the United Arab Emirates had sent him. The detainee then traveled to the Kallu Urdu Camp.
  4. The detainee claimed that in February 2000 he departed the Kallu Urdu Camp and was taken to the Ghulam Batsha Guest House. The detainee was given the name Duhana al Kurdi for security reasons.
  5. The detainee stated that while at the guest house, he worked with the weapons supply officer. The detainee duties included repairing and servicing heavy weapons.
  6. The detainee stated that after one week, the detainee departed Ghulam Batsha and was taken to the al Farouq Training Camp.
  7. The detainee claimed that after eighteen days of training he requested he to leave the al Farouq Training Camp. After submitting this request, the detainee claimed that he was suspected of spying for the United States or Israel.
  8. The detainee stated that he was helf for approximately two weeks at a guest house known as College of Islamic and Arabic Studies where he was interrogated and tortured.
  9. The detainee stated that he was then transferred to a second al Qaida guest house with several other Arabs where he was interrogated again.
  10. The detainee stated that he was later transferred to a military camp where he was kept for approximately twenty days. The detainee claimed that he was then turned over to the Taliban and was transferred to the Taliban's intelligence headquarters for approximately five days.
  11. The detainee stated that he was then transferred to Sarapooza, where he was held from May 2000 until being turned over to United States custody. The detainee said he was never interrogated while in Taliban custody.
  12. Sarpuza was a political prison in Afghanistan.
  13. In a video that was obtained from a senior member of al Qaida's residence, the detainee claims that he was recruited to join the jihad in Chechnya.
  14. A source claimed that the detainee was possibly an agent for the United Arab Emirates.
  15. Another source claimed that the detainee was recruited to be a spy while studying in United Arab Emirates and met with a western intelligence officer at a hotel.
b. Training
  1. The detainee stated that he attended the al Faroq Training Camp in Kabul, Afghanistan around January or February 2000.
  2. The detainee stated that while at al Farouq, he was given training on the Kalashnikov rifle, G-3, M16 and various other Russian/Saudi made weapons. The detainee stated that he also received training in mountain tactics, topography and jungle/guerilla-type warfare.
  3. A source stated that the detainee claimed to have received military training in the United Arab Emirates.
c. Connections/Associations
Usama bin Laden and a Taliban leader would hide at the prison complex.
d. Other Relevant Data
  1. The detainee claimed that after a dispute with father over a loan the detainee received from a friend, the detainee attempted to leave the United Arab Emirates.
  2. The detainee stated he is concerned for his brothers since he owes a large amount of money for drugs in Syria.
  3. A source claimed that the detainee was a frequent user of heroin and hashish and while in prison almost died of an overdose.
  4. A source claimed that the primary problem with the detainee was his sexual indiscretions with other young men, resulting in a guest house leader talking to the detainee. During this discussion, the detainee admitted his espionage activities.


The following primary factors favor release or transfer

a. A source stated that the Taliban tortured the detainee to the extent that he had little use of his right arm. As a result, the detainee spoke poorly of the Taliban.
b. The detainee claims that al Qaida tortured him until he admitted he was a spy.
c. The detainee denied having any knowledge of the attacks in the United States prior to their execution on 11 September 2001 and also denied knowledg of any rumors or plans of future attacks on the United States or United States interests.
e. The detainee said the he would like to go back to Syria but is afraid of what the Syrian government might do to him.


Relocation To BelgiumEdit

Janko was released in secret to Belgium in 2009. He now lives on welfare in the city of Antwerpen.[26] [27]

Suing the US GovernmentEdit

On June 20, 2008 the McClatchy News Service reported that Abdul Rahim Abdul Razak al Ginco[28]:

Newly empowered by the Supreme Court, Ginco has become the first Guantanamo detainee to demand in a U.S. federal court that the military show the hard evidence that justifies his detention. Scores of others are expected to do likewise, attorneys predict.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Expecting U.S. Help, Sent to Guantánamo [1] Tim Golden 2006-10-15
  2. OARDEC (May 15, 2006). "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/news/May2006/d20060515%20List.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-29. 
  3. Le « Belge » de Guantánamo est un jeune Syrien de 31 ans [2] LALLEMAND,ALAIN October 17, 2009
  4. CBC, Two Canadians among fugitive al-Qaeda members, January 26, 2002
  5. Most Wanted Terrorists Seeking Information, January 17, 2002
  6. Martyrdom Messages/video, Seeking Information Alert, video clips published by the FBI January 17, 2002, and photos of remaining 5 terrorists, FBI archival after September 2002
  7. FBI Seeking Information - War on Terrorism, Martyrdom Messages/video Seeking Information Alert, VIDEO 2 minutes 11 seconds, mpg (29.1 mb)
  8. FBI Seeking Information - War on Terrorism, Martyrdom Messages/video Seeking Information Alert, VIDEO 2 minutes 11 seconds, rm (229 kb - stream)
  9. FBI Seeking Information - War on Terrorism, Martyrdom Messages/video Seeking Information Alert, VIDEO 2 minutes 11 seconds, asf (371 kb - stream)
  10. FBI Seeking Information - War on Terrorism archive page, Internet Archive Wayback Machine, February 2, 2003
  11. From Taliban jail to Gitmo – hard-luck prisoners tell of unending ordeal [3] Paul Haven June 30, 2007
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 Guantánamo inmate tortured by al-Qaeda and entombed by the US [4] Tim Reid 2009-01-16 mirror
  13. OARDEC (date redacted). "Summarized Statement". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 1–15. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/Set_30_2048-2144.pdf#1. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  14. OARDEC, Index to Transcripts of Detainee Testimony and Documents Submitted by Detainees at Combatant Status Review Tribunals Held at Guantanamo Between July 2004 and March 2005, September 4, 2007
  15. OARDEC (27 October 2004). "Summary of Evidence for Combatant Status Review Tribunal -- Janko, Adb Al Rahim Abdul Rassak". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 14–15. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/000400-000499.pdf#14. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  16. OARDEC (date redacted). "Summarized Statement". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 148–161. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/Set_51_3490-3642_Revised.pdf#148. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  17. 17.0 17.1 US releases Guantanamo files [5] April 4, 2006
  18. p
    • Abdulrahim Abdul Razak Al Ginco v. Robert M. Gates -- 07-1090 [6] April 24, 2007
    • Abdulrahim Abdul Razak Al Ginco v. Robert M. Gates -- 07-1090 [7] October 1, 2007
  19. OARDEC (August 8, 2007). "Index for CSRT Records Publicly Files in Guantanamo Detainee Cases" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/index_publicly_filed_CSRT_records.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-29. 
  20. Justices reject first Gitmo appeal [8] June 16, 2008 mirror
  21. "Annual Administrative Review Boards for Enemy Combatants Held at Guantanamo Attributable to Senior Defense Officials". March 6, 2007. http://www.defense.gov/transcripts/transcript.aspx?transcriptid=3902. Retrieved November 12, 2010. 
  22. OARDEC (date redacted). "Summary of Administrative Review Board Proceedings of ISN 489". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 92–107. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Transcript_Set_18_23052-23263.pdf#92. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  23. OARDEC (24 October 2005). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Janko, Abd Al Rahim Abdul Rassak". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 49–50. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Round_1_Factors_000394-000494.pdf#49. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  24. OARDEC (26 June 2006). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Janko, Abd AL Rahim Abdul Raza". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 73–75. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Round_2_Factors_499-598.pdf#73. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  25. Al Qaidastrijder uit Guantanamo woont op leefloon in Borgerhout [9] Lex Moolenaar May 28, 2010
  26. Filip Dewinter (May 28, 2010). "Al Qaidastrijder verblijft in Borgerhout, ontvangt verblijfsvergunning, leefloon en tal van premies". http://www.filipdewinter.be/2010/05/28. 
  27. Guantanamo prisoner opens new era of court challenges [10] Michael Doyle, Marisa Taylor June 20, 2008 mirror

External linksEdit


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